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Sunday, November 23, 2014

34. Death of John Rogers 1755 his estates the heirs at the time

John Rogers died 24 June 1755.

At the time of his death there were 5 surviving co-heirs:

William Archdeacon
Jemima Montagu
Crewe Montagu
Edward Montagu
Anthony Isaacson

However Crewe Montagu died in 1755, and Jemima died in 1759, leaving the estate to the remaing three cousins.

Prior to his death Edward Montagu and Sir Thomas Claverling were appointed his trustees.   His estates were vast, and had been mismanaged for some time, according.

The once busy coal fields have given over to the bustling modern Newcastle, and the River Tyne, so narrow is this river it is hard to imagine all the activity that must have happened in our ancestor's time.






A CURIOUS LETTER. 14S   This letter and comments is found in the Archives of a series of letters written over time and included in archive records of Edward Montagu.

John Rogers seemed to have had fits as early as 1718.  (Not sure where if this has been proven)

He married in 1713, Anne Delaval, who died in 1723 at Seaton Delaval, and he seems to have become deranged soon after her death. As long as his mother lived he was well cared for, but she died in 1733, and the last nine years he had been gradually getting worse, and a set of designing people surrounded him. I have a letter of his written to his parents, apparently on going to Oxford in 1705, which is so curious that I insert it here.

It is addressed —

"To

"John Rogers, Esqr., att

" The House in Newcastle upon Tyne,
"These—"

"Dear Father,

" I hope since that I am fallen into the hands of a gentleman, who is not only a stranger to you, but to
all my relations, that you will do me the favour to write to my tutor, which I am sure he can't but take exceeding well, having never heard from any of my friends since I removed heather.

I had notice by my Mother yt you had ordered me ;^40, and wonder that as yet I have not heard from John Nicholson, that, I fancy Mr. Atkinson's letter has miscarried. I see Mr. Fremantel here on
Sunday night who sett forward for Newcastle on Monday morning, that I fancy you will see him before you receive this.

We had one man executed here on Saturday morning who was taken here just a little
before our assizes by two Smiths, he had been twice put in the Gazett for a highwayman, and those fellows took him, hoped to receive the reward. The fellow knowing himself to be a great rogue, and that if he escaped here, they would have had a Habeas Corpus to remove him, sent for the man whose horse it was he had stolen, to come to challenge his horse, and was indited for it and pleaded guilty, hoping I suppose to be transported.

There was a great interest made at Court for to save his life, but all would not do but by this he has baulked the fellows yt took him of their ;^40.

" So with my duty to my Mother and yourself,
" I am, dear Father,

" Your dutiful Son,

Elizabeth Montagu was a prolific letter writer, there are over 7000 letters which she wrote and have been documented and written into books.  To read them is again, very interesting.

She makes mention that Sarah Rogers lived with her son at Sandleford  in 1733, Charles Montagu may have been the lessee before his son took over.

Some excerpts of letters written regarding John Rogers.  The content of the letters indicates that Edward is the sole beneficiary of the estate.


"The death of a relation of Mr Montagu's in the North, which happened about a fortnight ago, with a large accession of fortune, has brought me the usual accompaniment of riches, a great deal of business, a great deal of hurry, and a great many ceremonious engagements.  The ordering funeral ceremonies, putting a large family in mourning, preparing for a journey of 280 miles, and receiving and paying visits on this event, has made me the most busy miserable creature in the world.

As the gentleman from whom Mr Montagu inherits had been mad above 40 years and almost bed-ridden in the last ten, I had always designed to be rather pleased and happy when he resigned his unhappy being and his good estate.  I thought in fortune's as in folly's cup still laughed the bubble joy; but though this is a bumper, there is not a drop of joy in it, nor so much as the froth of a little merriment.

As soon as I rise in the morning, my housekeeper with a face full of care, comes to know what must be packed up for Newcastle; to her succeeds the Butler, who want to know what wine, etc, is to be sent down; to them succeed men of business and money transactions; then the post brings twenty letters, which must be considered and some answered.

In about a week we shall set out for the North, where I am to pass about three months in the delectable conversation of Stewards and manager of coal mines, and this by courtesy is called good fortune, and I am congratulated upon it by every one I meet; while in truth, like a poor Harlequin in the play I am acting a silly part dans l'embarras des richesses.

I would not have troubled you with this detail, but as part of my defence for not having written to you.  I can perfectly understand why you were afraid of me last year, and I will tell you, for you won't tell me; perhaps you have not told yourself.

You had heard I set up as a wit, and people of real merit and sense hate to converse with witlings, as rich merchant ships dread to engage privateers, they may receive damage and can get nothing but dry blows.  I am happy you have found out I am not to be reared; I am afraid I must improve myself much before you will find I am to be loved.


She mentions the funeral of John Rogers: 

My cousin Rogers' funeral we had ordered to be as private as decency would permit, as he had been so long dead to Society, but even that was attended by 38 gentlemen's coaches.

She mentions also living at Pilgrim Street, at the town house of the late Mr Rogers' "an exceeding good house" it is called.





August 6, from Darlington     P 137

"I desired Dr Monsey to acquaint you with the death of Mr Rogers.  Many letters were to be written in order to procure him most pompous funeral  obsequies, according to the fashion of Northumberland, as he was allied to the people of the first rank in the county, and they were all to be at the funeral.

The 7th August at noon we got to Durham, and there began hurrs and ceremonies that have continued to this day and I know not when I shall see a quiet hour.  At Durham we were met by a great number of Mr. Rogers' relations and the Receivers and Agents of his estate, who attended in great form till we got to Newcastle, where we were to stay two or three days, with a relation of Mr Montagu's till our house was aired.

We had not been an hour at Newcastle before we had the compliments of the principal persons of the Corporation and in the town.  The next morning visits began.  We had fifteen people to dine here on Sunday, a family yesterday, people about business today, and three families to dine here  tomorrow; in the morning I am up to the elbows in dusty parchments and accounts, after dinner as busy as a hostess of an Inn attending her guests, at night as sick as an invalid in Hospital, and these are the woes of wealth, and I am not une malade imaginaire.... Mr Rogers' family Mansion* having been uninhabited many years, was not fit for our reception, his house in Newcastle was not agreeably situated for the summer, so we hired a house on the banks of the Tyne for the occasion.. 

In other correspondence she adds that Denton Hall


"had not been inhabited for 30 years, the poor gentleman having long been a lunatick, so I imagined the rats and ghosts were in such full possession, it would require time to eject them, and I am now placed as I could wish being within 4 miles of Tinmouth.

We have a very good land as well as water prospect.  We see from our windows the place where once lived the Venerable Bede, some little ruins show still, I believe where the monastery stood.


 The place is called Jarrow, the estate belonged to Sir Thomas Clavering and the late Mr Rogers.  I shall visit it more from respect to the old Historian than curiosity to see a new possession"



From the writings of Elizabeth Montagu


She  mentions that Mr Montagu had bought all the jewels belonging to Mr Rogers for her, "an to-day intimated he should give ma a great purse of old gold which fell to his share in the division; some of the pieces are curious but there will be between 60 and 70 pound of money that one may spend with good conscience"

Later mention is made that Mr Montagu had returned to his wife, having bought another portion of the Denton estate from Mr Archdeacon his cousin. 

 He made a codicil to his previous will of 1752. leaving his wife the whole property as well as all he possessed besides.  The codicil was witnessed by Ben Stillingfleet, William Archdeacon and Samuel Torriano  12th April 1759



Later they mention Lady Medows, Mr Montagu's sister, who had long been suffering from cancer, died at the end of October/  Horace Walpole says in his letter to George Montagu that she left Lady Sandwich's daughter 9000 pounds after the death of her husband Sir Sydney Medows.

And that was the reason for all the posts about Sir Sidney's will and the relevations that unfolded!

From the archives old Newcastle

In fact Elizabeth Montague wrote a lot of letters with Lord Lyttleton, and even collaborated with him in writing a book!

Lord George Lyttelton was a friend and supporter to Alexander Pope in the 1730s and to Henry Fielding in the 1750s. James Thomson addresses him throughout his poem The Seasons, and Lyttelton arranged a pension for Thomson.


He wrote Dialogues of the Dead in 1760 with Elizabeth Montagu, leader of the bluestockings, and The History of the Life of Henry the Second (1767–1771). The former work is part of a tradition of such dialogues.





Henry Fielding dedicated Tom Jones to him. Lyttelton spent many years and a fortune developing Hagley Hall and its park which contains many follies. The hall itself, which is in north Worcestershire, was designed by Sanderson Miller and is the last of the great Palladian houses to be built in England.

His son Thomas Lyttleton, had a fine reputation, well known for his choice of unreputable ladies!







And in more archives there are details of the land which he owned, the partnerships he was involved in and the leases which he had granted.
A map of the coal mines known in the area

Account of coals wrought out of lands of George Bowes and John Rogers, George Bowes and Mr. Montague, George Bowes' partners, and others, endorsed: 'Coals Wrought out of Ravensworth Grounds and Laydon Field by Lord Ravensworth', 1746 - 1762

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)
(1 paper)
Ref: D/St/B1/5/23
Account of leadings from Ravensworth South Pasture, with related account of George Bowes, 1752 - 1758

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)
(1 paper)
Ref: D/St/B1/5/24

List of lands of Mr. Bowes and Mr. Rogers and of Mr. Bowes only in the common field and enclosures, Ravensworth, including details of field names and acreages, with related paper enclosed, n.d. [1750s]

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)
(1 volume, card bound, and 1 paper)


Account of coals wrought out of the joint lands of George Bowes and the late John Rogers in Ravensworth township, with details of deductions and disputed pieces of land and abstract of George Bowes' and the late John Rogers' account, 1758

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)

7 November 1702

(1) James Clavering of Greencroft, Esquire and Jane his wife
(2) James Clavering the younger, son and heir apparent of (1)
(3) William Blackett of Newby, Yorkshire, Esquire and Robert Ellison of Hebburne, Esquire
(4) Henry Clavering of Greencroft, Esquire and David Dixon of Durham, gentleman

Copy of marriage settlement of (2) and Katherine Yorke, eldest daughter of Thomas Yorke of Richmond, Yorkshire. Release by (1) and (2) to (4) of the Manors of Greencroft, Middleton [St] George and Iveston and all lands, tenements etc. there or in the parish of Lanchester; a farmhold in Tanfield; land at South Causey; Iveston free rents (£5 p.a.); Morden free rents (£9 10s. p.a.); tithes of corn and grain at Iveston; a moiety of lands and tenements at Lamesley, Ravensworth Park, Harburn [Hebburn] and Jarrow and of burgages in Newcastle upon Tyne; a quarter of lands and tenements in Barmeston; an eighth of Jarrow Shore and the reversion of lands and tenements in Harburne and Jarrow expectant upon the death of Ann Doubleday.

 Upon trust for James Clavering the elder and Jane his wife for life as specified for the Greencroft, Tanfield and Causey premises and Morden rents. Thence:as to the Manor of Greencroft to the use of Jane Clavering, wife of (1) for life; as to the Manors of Middleton George and Iveston and all other premises, and as to the first above limited properties fr6m the death of (1) etc to the use of (2) for life and his issue in tail male with remainders specified, charged with an annuity of £250 to his widow. 

Powers for raising portions and jointures. Covenants for levying a fine Note of production in James Clavering the younger v Robert Ellison and others in Chancery, 29 June 1716

Consideration: £2000 and £500 secured to be paid to (2) as marriage portion
(1 file)



Item
84
Title
Lease for 21 years by William Bonner of Kibblesworth, gentleman, Edward Orde of Newcastle, gentleman, Robert Ellison of Hebburn, esquire, James Clavering of Lamesley, esquire and Mrs Elisabeth Rogers of Newcastle, shareholders of Jarrow, to George Bambrough of Jarrow Shore, anchor smith



Account of coals wrought out of lands of George Bowes and John Rogers, George Bowes and Mr. Montague, George Bowes' partners, and others, endorsed: 'Coals Wrought out of Ravensworth Grounds and Laydon Field by Lord Ravensworth', 1746 - 1762

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)
(1 paper)
Ref: D/St/B1/5/23
Account of leadings from Ravensworth South Pasture, with related account of George Bowes, 1752 - 1758

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)
(1 paper)
Ref: D/St/B1/5/24
List of lands of Mr. Bowes and Mr. Rogers and of Mr. Bowes only in the common field and enclosures, Ravensworth, including details of field names and acreages, with related paper enclosed, n.d. [1750s]

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)
(1 volume, card bound, and 1 paper)


Account of coals wrought out of the joint lands of George Bowes and the late John Rogers in Ravensworth township, with details of deductions and disputed pieces of land and abstract of George Bowes' and the late John Rogers' account, 1758

Part of a bundle of papers concerning property at Ravensworth (D/St/B1/5/15-32)


Bet the local solicitors made a fortune sorting out all the estate!




1721 George Bowes, although being the youngest son, inherited the estates in 1721, on the deaths of his elder brothers. He fell in love with Gibside and spent much care and money on developing and landscaping the estate. He was a man of many interests, rich and influential and was for some years M.P. for Durham.

 Much of his wealth came from the coal which lay beneath his estates and in 1726 he helped form the Grand Alliance of coal owners to control the profitable London coal trade. This Grand Alliance was also instrumental in building the Causey Arch for the easier transportation of coal from the pits in the Tanfield area to the River Tyne.

Sir George Bowes (21 August 1701 – 17 September 1760) was an English Member of Parliament and coal proprietor.

George Bowes was baptised on 4 September 1701, the youngest son of Sir William Bowes, MP, and Elizabeth Bowes (née Blakiston). The Bowes family had been prominent in County Durham, with their ownership of the estate and castle of Streatlam but, in 1713, George's father acquired (from his wife's family) the Gibside estate which included some of the area's richest coal seams and led to the family's acquisition of immense wealth through the coal trade. This wealth was, however, gained through the employment of men, women and children in conditions that would now be considered intolerable.


George Bowes inherited the family estates in 1721—although he was the youngest son, his elder brothers died young. In October 1724 he married the fourteen-year-old Eleanor Verney, but she died in December of that year.

Her death was commemorated in a poem, written by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, which implied that she had died as a result of Bowes' sexual vigour.      Trust our Mary to write something like that

Bowes went on to marry Mary Gilbert in 1747 and had one daughter, Mary Eleanor Bowes, born 24 February 1748 (old style)/1749 (new style).

She married John Lyon, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, who later took the name "Bowes", as a condition of the will of George Bowes, in order to inherit the Bowes estate. They formed the Bowes-Lyon family, one of whose descendants was the late Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, known in Britain as The Queen Mother.


Bowes was for some years the Member of Parliament for County Durham and he was rich and influential, largely on account of the coal which lay beneath his estates.

In 1726 he was a founder of the Grand Alliance of coal owners, a cartel for the control of the London coal trade.

George Bowes' principal residence was Gibside, a mansion on the banks of the River Derwent, in County Durham.


The surrounding park was laid out by Lancelot "Capability" Brown and includes a column, 140 feet high, dedicated to British liberty. On George Bowes death, Gibside passed to his son-in-law, the ninth Earl of Strathmore, who built a chapel in the grounds, in Palladian style, as a mausoleum, in which Bowes was finally interred, when it was completed it in 1812.




http://www.mininginstitute.org.uk/papers/TurnbullMontagu.html




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