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Thursday, December 18, 2014

42.1.4 Andrew Durnford and Harriett West (Westwood) Their family

     

       In 1804, for some reason, Andrew Durnford left Barbara.  Presumably she had the children with her, as the youngest Edward was only born in 1803.

S    Some report that Andrew ran off with the maid, which is highly probable.  Her name was Harriet Westwood.   She was born 1789 in Gloucester and died probably from childbirth in 1823

       Her parents William and Elizabeth were from Gloucester.  Harriet was only around 17 at the time.

       Her name has been recorded as Harriet West, however when considering that she had a daughter  whose name included the surname Westwood, as was the custom of the time, it is fairly likely that is  her surname.  She also called her children from her parent's names, William and Elizabeth were the  names of her parents, and included in the children's names as well.

      Their children were

r      1.   Frederick Andrew Durnford, b. Feb 1805, d. Feb 28, 1902, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, England.
        2 .  William George Durnford,    b  1807  d. Apr 28, 1867, Feltham House, East Moulsey, Surrey,
        3.   Eliza Durnford           1813      1891
        4  . Alfred C. Durnford, b. Jul 01, 1818, Lambeth, Surrey, England, d. Apr 18, 1898, 
                                                                                                             Richland County, WI.
        5.  Charlotte Louisa Westwood Durnford       1820   1869
        6.  Sarah Durnford             13  April 1823  d  1823
F
    Harriet Woodward  1789  died    28 May 1823  Potterspury Northamptonshire

Potterspury is a village and civil parish in the district of South Northamptonshire. The nearest main town is Milton Keynes, the centre of which is about 7 miles south-east

     1. Frederick Andrew Durnford was born in 1805 and in 1836 he married Sebiana Massey                                                  at St James London.    
      They had 5 children

   Agnes, Sarah, Emma, Frederick Andrew Junior and Henry Montagu Durnford
Parliament Street

       Frederick Durnford was a Parliamentary agent, he brought bills           and papers to the house, on behalf of others.  
      
      His eldest son and his brother William George Durnford were
      partners in the business  and it was located in Parliament Street London, a pretty impressive area near Parliament House.  

In 1868 they  dissolved the partnership, possibly as he retired.

      During his career, he was also insolvent in 1844.

      Frederick was a painter, of Maritime Prints.  He later joined the military.
      His son Frederick Andrew Durnford Jnr was a stockbroker

 






 










     Agnes Isbiana Durnford   b 1837  did not marry and lived firstly with her  parents in Lambeth,                                                                                then   later to Walton in Surrey 
     Sarah Durnford                          was born 1839
     Emma  Durnford                       was born in 1841 
     Frederick Andrew Durnford      was born 1843
     Henry Montagu Durnford          was born 1844.


 2.  William George Durnford was born in 1807 at Rothbury in Northuberland and lived at St George Square Hanover Square London.  He was part of the Durnford Agents business with his brother.

  He married Mary Milner in 1863 in Yorkshire, and he died in 1867, at Feltham House Surrey.

    He also owned a property at 57 High Street Woolwich.








       
          3  Eliza Durnford   was born November 1813 and died in 1891 in Walton on Thames in Surrey. 
           
            In 1841 she was living with her father and the children he had with Mary Hadley.  She must have       been helping to raise them.   She lived most of her life with her brother Frederick and their                    family, and had a daughter                Harriet Durnford born 1855


,
         4.  Alfred Dunford    was born 1st May 1818 in Peckham, London, and baptised 1st July 1818 at 
                   St Giles, Camberwell, London.  In 1840 he married Anna M. Smith at St James Westminster.

      He and Anna had nine children

      1.     Alfred Montagu Durnford    b  29 August 1841 in Lambeth St Mary  died October 1848 at                                                            Westminster St Margaret

      2.     Annie Eliza Durnford           b   27 April 1843  in Lambeth, baptised 1 March 1844 St Mary's
                       Anne married James W Ward in 1865 at Richland, Wisconin US. She died 1872
                                                                                        In Richmond

      3.     Harriet Amelia Durnford was born 1st February 1845 in Lambeth  She married John Marion                          Shireman in September 1874, aged 29 in Wisconsin US   She died 1929 in Richland 

      4.    George Alfred Durnford  born 18 October 186 in Lambeth and in 1879 he married Mary                       Franklin   Travers in Richland Wisconsin US.  He died 26 October 1902 in Rockbridge                        Richland     Wisconsin US

            5.    Alfred Frederick Durnford was born 16 January 1848 in Lambeth and he died in 1860 at                              Dayton  Richland, Wisconsin.

      6.    Eliza Emily Durnford was born 20 January 1850 in Richmond Surrey baptised in 29 Sept                              1850   and died 29 Sept 1850 at Lambeth.

      7.    Rosa Emily Durnford was born 14th Oct 1853 in London, and was baptised at St Mildred's in                    Poultry, St May Colechurch, London.   In 1876 she married Lewis Edward                                            James, in Wisconson and she died in 1916 at Richland Wisconsin.

       8.  Edward H Durnford was born 27 July 1859 in Wisconsin and in 1880 married Ida Ann Porter

       9.  Frederick H Durnford was born 8th June 1862 in Dayton, he married Ella Jane Morrison and                   he   died 1930 in Milwaukee

           In 1851 the family were living with Anna's parents 23 Caledonia Street  Islington, as the list                   from  the census shows.
.                        

         Annas' grandparents had interesting occupations.

          Her father Edward Smith   64       was a retired farmer
          Ann                     his wife   64
          Frederick              his son     35  was a   labourer
          Charles                his son     33  was  a  labourer
          Henry                   his son     26 was a billiard parlour owner
          Eliza        their daughter was 26 and   a milliner        
          Emily       their daughter was 22 and a milliner
          Susanna    their daughter was 18 and a milliner

          Alfred Durnford and Anne were staying there with their children Anne George Alfred and                      Eliza.       Alfred lists his employment as out of business.  His daughter Harriet was staying                   with his brother.

       It is unknown what he was doing before 1851, nor where the family were living. In 1853 the                emigrated to US, and they settled in Richland County.


5.  Charlotte Louisa Westwood Durnford was born August 1820 in Bermondsey in Surrey. She married Thomas Copeland Woodman in July 1848.  Thomas died in 1849, and Charlotte died in 1865 in Dudley Staffordshire.

  6.  Sarah Durnford  was born April 1823 and died shortly afterwards.


      These stories from his family.    He may have worked for some time with his uncle in their agency


 Alfred Durnford was educated for the legal profession, and for a number of years was engaged in parliamentary solicitorship. In 1840 he united  in marriage with Annie Smith, and in the fall of 1854 emigrated to the United States.

He stopped at Milwaukee until the spring following, then came farther 
      west and became one of the early settlers of Richland county. He purchased land on section 2, town of Dayton, and engaged in farming. But as he was admitted to the bar soon after coming to the county, he gave considerable of big time to the practice of law, and as his practice increased he left the farm and removed to Richland Centre and gave his entire attention to the legal profession until 1880, when on account of failing health he retired from practice, and now resides in the north part of the village, where he owns thirty acres of land, and is pleasantly located. 

      He became asssociated with the democratic party soon after coming to America, and still adheres to its ranks, but has never taken any further interest than to perform his duty as an enlightened citizen. He was court commissioner for several years, and has served as justice of the peace. His religious convictions are with the Presbyterian society. 


      Mr. and Mrs. Durnford have reared eleven children, five now living — George, Harriet, now Mrs. J. M. Shireman; Rosa, now Mrs. Lewis James; Edward H. and Frederick W.


Perhaps the stories originated with the 1884 Bar Records of Richland county

http://www.usgenweb.info/wirichland/books/chap9.htm


 In 1884 the bar of Richland county was composed of the following gentlemen: H A Eastland, James H Miner, Oscar F Black, Kirk W Eastland, F W Burnham, J H Berryman, Michael Murphy and Thomas A Johnston, all of Richland Centre, and actively engaged in practice. In addition to the above the following gentlemen are members of the bar but are not engaged in practice: David Strickland, S H Doolittle, A Durnford and H W Eastland, of Richland Centre; Newton Wells, of the town of Eagle; L M Thorp, of Excelsior; and Dr. R M Miller, of Port Andrew.


Alfred Durnford is a native of England, born in Peckham, near London, May 1, 1818. His father, *Andrew Montague Isaacson Durnford, was lieutenant-colonel in the Third Guards, British army, and the family was consequently not permanently settled at any given place; but resided in various parts of Great Britain and Ireland. Alfred Durnford was educated for the legal profession, and for a number of years was engaged in parliamentary solicitorship. In 1840 he united in marriage with Annie Smith, and in the fall of 1854 emigrated to the United States. He stopped at Milwaukee until the spring following, then came farther west and became one of the early settlers of Richland county. He purchased land on section 2, town of Dayton, and engaged in farming. But as he was admitted to the bar soon after coming to the county, he gave considerable of his time to the practice of law, and as his practice increased he left the farm and removed to Richland Centre and gave his entire attention to the legal profession until 1880, when on account of failing health he retired from practice, and now resides in the north part of the village, where he owns thirty acres of land, and is pleasantly located. He became associated with the democratic with the democratic party soon after coming to America, and still adheres to its ranks, but has never taken any further interest than to perform his duty as an enlightened citizen. He was court commissioner for several years, and has served as justice of the peace. His religious convictions are with the Presbyterian society. Mr. and Mrs. Durnford have reared eleven children, five now living --- George, Harriet, now Mrs. J M Shireman; Rosa, now Mrs. Lewis James; Edward H and Frederick W.



* His father was only in the Army a short while, see the post of his life.

In the 1841 Census he was listed as a Clerk, and in 1851 he was living with his in-laws.
He may have been working in insurance, after the collapse of his brother's firm in 1844.
He was working in a coffee shop and living in London. Perhaps the coffee shop was in the Spectacle Makers Guild, as he applied for and was granted admission.  The idea of Freedom of the City, was a money making exercise, wherein for a fee, you were allowed to operate in the square controlled by a particular guild.


The medieval term 'freeman' meant someone who was not the property of a feudal lord but enjoyed privileges such as the right to earn money and own land. Town dwellers who were protected by the charter of their town or city were often free – hence the term 'freedom' of the City.
From the Middle Ages and the Victorian era, the Freedom was the right to trade, enabling members of a Guild or Livery to carry out their trade or craft in the Square Mile.

A fee or fine would be charged and in return the Livery Companies would ensure that the goods and services provided would be of the highest possible standards. In 1835, the Freedom was widened to incorporate not just members of Livery Companies but also people living or working in the City or those with a strong London connection.











       Edward Durnford son of Alfred,

       Bears an enviable reputation as a manufacturer of and dealer in fine furniture, and his place of business is one of the leading emporiums of trade in Richland Center. Mr. Durnford is a native of Richland county, having been born in the town of Marshall, July 27, 1859, and he is the son of Alfred Durnford, deceased, who deserves more than a passing notice in a work devoted to the history of Richland county and her people.

      Alfred Durnford was a native of England, born in Peckham, near London, May 1, 1818. His father, Andrew Montague Isaacson Durnford, was lieutenant-colonel in the Third Guards, British army, and the family was consequently not permanently settled at any given place, but resided in various parts of Great Britain and Ireland.

      Alfred Durnford was educated for the legal profession, and for a number of years was engaged in parliamentary solicitorship in London. In 1840 he was united in marriage with Annie Smith, and in the fall of 1854 emigrated to the United States. He stopped at Milwaukee until the following spring, then moved farther west and became one of the early settlers of Richland county.

     There was no railroad leading west from Milwaukee at that time, and he made the trip to his destination with an ox team. He first purchased land on section 2 in the town of Dayton and engaged in farming, but as he was admitted to the bar soon after coming to the county he gave considerable of his time to the practice of law.



      As his practice increased he left the farm in 1864, and removed to Richland Center, where he gave his entire attention to the legal profession until 1880, when on account of failing health he retired
      from practice and resided on a tract of land, pleasantly located in the north part of the city, until his death, April 17, 1898, his wife having died Nov. 3, 1878, at the age of sixty-four years.

     He became associated with the Democratic party soon after coming to America and ever after adhered to the principles of that organization but he never took any further interest than to perform his duty as an enlightened citizen. He was court commissioner several years and also served as justice of the peace. His religious convictions were in accord with the Presbyterian faith.

     Mr. and Mrs. Durnford were the parents of seven children: Annie, Harriet, and George are deceased; Rosa married Lewis E. James and resides in Richland Center; Alfred is deceased; Edward W. is the subject of this review; and Frederick resides in Richland Center. Edward W. Durnford was educated in the public schools and began his independent career at the age of twenty-one, working at the carpenter trade. The following year he commenced contracting and building in Richland Center and vicinity, and afterward also operated in Vernon, Crawford and Sauk counties.

      He built the Presbyterian church at Richland Center, was connected with the erection of the high school building at the same place, and a great many of the fine residences in Richland's county seat are monuments to his handiwork. He has made a specialty of all kinds of fancy architecture, doing a great deal of work in that line, and he employs as many as fourteen men to carry out and complete his numerous contracts.

      In 1902 he erected a factory in Richland Center, where he does all kinds of finishing work for house-building, and he also manufactures furniture, tables, parlor stands, kitchen tables, cupboards, etc. He also conducts a large furniture store, comprising two stories and a basement, where he constantly has on hand an extensive stock of furniture and wall-paper, and it can be said without exaggeration that he is one of the enterprising business men of Richland Center.

      Mr. Durnford was married Aug. 20, 1880, to Miss Ida Porter, of Fort Atkinson, daughter of Isaac R. Porter and wife, both of whom are now deceased. Mrs. Durnford's parents were early settlers in Fort Atkinson, coming there from New York state about 1850.

      Mr. and Mrs. Durnford are the parents of four children: Rosa, Cleavie, Freddie and Willie, (the two latter being deceased). The two living children reside at home with their parents. The subject of this review is a member of the Mystic Workers and the Yeomen, and he and his wife are communicants of the Presbyterian church.

    
      Frederick H Durnford, of Richland Center, was born in the town of Dayton, Richland county, June 8, 1862, the son of Alfred Durnford, also mentioned in this work. He was educated in the schools of Richland Center, entering the high school with the class of 1881, although he did not remain in school until the completion of the course.

      He bought a farm of 140 acres when he was nineteen years of age, but afterward sold it, and was for fourteen years a traveling salesman; changing his occupation to that of farming, he purchased a farm of 160 acres, which he runs largely for dairying and stock raising, making a specialty of a breed of Yorkshire hogs; he is also a dealer in and a shipper of stock.

      Besides his home farm, Mr. Durnford owns 100 acres of land in the town of Willow. He was married Dec. 22, 1886, to Miss Ella Morrison, a native of Richland county, and the daughter of H. J. and Sallie (Fox) Morrison, both deceased, who came from Ohio to Richland county among the very early settlers. Mr. and Mrs. Durnford have had eight children, viz., Dorothy, Harold, Fred, Henry, Helen (deceased), Willie (deceased), Dewey and Gladys. Mr. Durnford is a Republican, and he and his family are members of the Presbyterian church of Richland Center.













             
Spare a thought for this poor Harriot Westwood    Some of these old stories are worth a read.

   
Sarah (nee Parker, born c. 1801) and John Westwood had been married for some twenty years by 1843 and lived in the parish of Burntwood near Lichfield in Staffordshire.  John was a nail maker and was assisted in his small business by his son, seventeen year old Charles.  It seems the family were fairly poor.  The household, by 1843, comprised Sarah, John, Charles and four younger daughters. Three older children had already left home. 

Additionally there was a lodger, named Samuel Phillips who had lived with the Westwoods for some seven years and whom Sarah was believed to be having an affair with.  There had certainly been quarrels between John, Sarah and Samuel. 

One of these took place on September the 2nd in the street and was witnessed, the two men fighting and rolling around on the ground while Sarah watched.  John is alleged to have screamed at Samuel “Damn your eyes, what was you doing at her when I knocked you down?” Sarah was shouting at Samuel to kill John.  When the fight subsided Sarah threatened to leave John.  Another violent quarrel was witnessed by John’s brother, Robert Westwood, at his home. 

On Thursday the 9th of November John and Charles returned home to lunch as normal and John had some gruel, bread and meat for his meal.  He was in the habit of reading a few pages from the bible after lunch and then having a brief nap before returning to work

On this afternoon he rapidly complained of stomach pains and soon began vomiting.  Charles came home from work later in the afternoon and heard his mother ask John if he wanted her to get the local surgeon in to see him.  For whatever reason he refused this and died later in the evening. 

John had been in generally good health prior to this day and so his death was regarded as suspicious and a post mortem was ordered.  This was carried out by Mr. Charles Chevasse of Lichfield who found a large quantity of arsenic in John’s stomach so an inquest was therefore held.  

This took place before the Staffordshire Coroner, Mr. Thomas Philips, and returned a verdict of poisoning against Sarah who was arrested on Monday the 20th of November by Inspector John Raymond from nearby Shenstone police station and taken to Stafford Gaol.

On the way Sarah complained to the inspector that she could not obtain bail.  He told her that bail would be out of the question on a murder charge to which she replied that no one could prove she had murdered John.

The police investigated the source of the arsenic and were able to trace the purchase of it to Heighways Chemists in Walsall, some ten miles away. On the 1st of November 1843 Sarah had gone to the shop with Hannah Mason who was Samuel’s mother and known locally as “a wise woman”.  Hannah made a special remedy for a common complaint known as “the itch” which contained four ingredients, hellebore, red precipitate, white precipitate and arsenic.

Hannah mixed up the ingredients in the shop.  On the 8th of November Sarah returned alone to Heighways where she was able to purchase a further supply of the chemicals, as they remembered her having come in a few days previously with Hannah whom they trusted.  This time the chemicals were left in their separate packets.

Although there were normally only two assizes a year at Stafford, when there were large numbers of criminals awaiting trial a third could be organised and this took place on Thursday the 28th of December 1843. Baron Rolfe was the presiding judge, Mr. Corbett led the prosecution, assisted by Mr. Cope and Mr. Yardley led for the defence. 

Various witnesses were called by the prosecution, including ten year old Eliza Westwood, who recounted asking her mother what the white powder was in her father’s gruel.  Both she and her brother Charles also told the court that none of the children suffered from “the itch” which was the alleged reason for buying the chemicals.  Hannah Mason told of the shopping expedition to Walsall at the beginning of November.

The forensic evidence was presented and as usual evidence to show that John had been in good health immediately before lunch on the day of his death.  In his submission to the jury Mr. Corbett suggested that Sarah wanted to be rid of John so that she could have Samuel Philips and that this was the motive for the murder.

Mr. Yardley addressed the jury for some three hours in Sarah’s defence and did all he could to show that she may not have been guilty.  He reminded them that Sarah had asked John if she wanted her to send for the doctor but that it was he who had refused medical attention. 

He suggested that John may have committed suicide as he had been depressed since the early summer.  His efforts were to no avail and it took the jury just fifteen minutes to find Sarah guilty.  

They made a recommendation to mercy, but when the foreman was asked why by Baron Rolfe he could offer no reason for doing so.  Sarah continued to protest her innocence and then claimed she was pregnant.  A panel of matrons was sworn and within an hour they declared her not to be with child.

Sarah was visited in Stafford Gaol by her son Charles and daughter Harriet but Samuel Phillips was not permitted to see her which caused her much distress.

The Home Secretary, Sir James Graham, found no reason to intervene in the case, so an execution date of Saturday the 13th of January 1844 was set.

Sarah received the sacrament from the Reverend George Norman on Friday the 12th but was so weak that she had to be carried to and from the prison chapel.  Despite his entreaties she resolutely refused to make a confession.

She was reported to have slept little on the Friday night but to have managed two cups of tea and some bread and butter on the Saturday morning.  Sarah had to be helped to the gallows by two warders and once on the platform was allowed to sit on a stool while George Smith, Stafford’s hangman, made the preparations.

She was attended by the usual officials, the under sheriff, the governor and the chaplain.  Her last words were reported as “It’s hard to die for a thing one’s innocent of”.  At eight o’clock Smith released the trap doors and Sarah and the stool dropped. 

The execution was witnessed by a large crowd, comprising a majority of woman.  It would seem that her sufferings were quickly over.  She was the last woman to suffer at Stafford and her body was buried within the precincts of the gaol, the ninth interment there (six men and three women). 




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