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Tuesday, December 2, 2014

40.3.2 Researching the Durnfords Wiltshire Sir William de Derneford 1255 following from Sir Roger



Sir William de Derneford was a Knight, a Sheriff, and apparently the son of Sir Roger de Derneford.
There is now a John de Derneford in this lineage

 1255 he likewise had return of writs and answered at the Exchequer for the ..... The sheriffs of 1259–60 and 1260–1 were no longer royal nominees holding during ..... Hamon of Beckhampton, Richard de Haselden, and William of Durnford. ...... leading to the removal of the chancellor, treasurer, and many lesser officials, ...

Gaols were similarly delivered by four local knights, often the same men as were being commissioned for assizes. The first such commission for the delivery of Old Salisbury gaol dates from November 1236,  sixteen years later than the earliest known examples of this type of commission.

 Perhaps so long as the Longespees were at the castle, they appointed their own justices to deliver the gaol. The 'four justices' of 1236, who were also appointed to try a petty assize at Devizes in the following August,  were Reynold of Calne, Hamon of Beckhampton, Richard de Haselden, and William of Durnford.

The first had already been an assize commissioner on many occasions and was escheator in 1232. Beckhampton had been an assize commissioner in 1225 and 1229 and a coroner in 1232, and Haselden still held that office in 1236. Similar commissions to four knights were issued in 1237, 1242, 1244, 1246, and 1247, that for 1242 being for the delivery of the gaol at Marlborough;  and such commissions continued to be issued throughout the reign of Henry III.

        ISABELLE de Tosny (-after [1158]). Isabel de Tosny widow of Walter FitzRichard donated property to Durnford, Wiltshire and to Salisbury Cathedral, confirmed by Henry II King of England by charter dated to before 1158. m WALTER FitzRichard, son of [RICHARD Lord of Clare and Tonbridge & his wife Rohese Giffard (-1138)].

1140, Walter of Salisbury [Patrick’s father] and Patrick, earl of Salisbury, witnessed a gift of the church of Durnford by Isabel de Tony, wife of Walter fitz Richard, to the cathedral for the soul of her husband. (S) Fasti Ecclesiae Sarisberiensis, Jones, P377.



Survey of the manor of Clarendon and of the Forest was carried out in 1272 by Sir William de Deneford Knight and others for Edward the First a list of repairs was noted  Sir Hugh le Engleis Sir John de Grimstede, Sir John de Monmouth


Clarendon Palace is a medieval ruin near Salisbury in Wiltshire, England. The palace was a royal residence during the Middle Ages, and was the location of the Assize of Clarendon which developed the Constitutions of Clarendon. The name Clarendon is the Old English word for 'clover covered hill'.

There is evidence that the Romans used Clarendon Forest on a regular basis. A Roman road connecting to Old Sarum British Iron Age hillfort passes east-west approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Clarendon Forest. Archaeological finds suggest that the area was relatively densely populated in the Roman period

Both Henry II and Henry III invested heavily in the property and converted it into a royal residence and palace. Considerable building work took place in the early-to-mid 13th century, including the construction of King's Chapel and the Antioch chamber under the supervision of Elias of Dereham, the ecclesiastical administrator who also oversaw the building of Salisbury Cathedral.

In 1164, Henry II framed the Constitutions of Clarendon here, which attempted to restrict ecclesiastical privileges and place limits on Papal authority in England. A memorial erected on the site in 1844 stated:

"The spirit awakened within these walls ceased not until it had vindicated the authority of the laws and accomplished the Reformation of the Church of England".[2]
It was in 1453 at Clarendon Palace that King Henry VI first started to show signs of insanity. Usage of the Palace declined and by 1500, the building was no longer being maintained, and in 1574 it was described as a simple hunting lodge. In that year, Elizabeth I visited the site, but the buildings were in such poor condition that she had to dine in a temporary "banquett house


Clarendon was one of only a handful of sites occupied by royalty from the Norman Conquest to the Tudor period. It was a royal possession as early as in Anglo-Saxon times - William the Conqueror mustered troops there in 1070. Successive kings and queens from Henry I to Henry VI, especially Henry III, Edward II and Edward III, invested in the buildings and the surrounding deer park, which was the largest in England.

The palace fell into disrepair after 1485, but the magnificent park, with its 'twenty groves' or coppices, open 'launds' and woodpasture, remained a royal asset up to the Civil War. By 1574, when Elizabeth I visited, there were many deer in the park; 300 were culled as gifts for her guests, who enjoyed watching deer-coursing on a special 'paddock course', which ran across the undulating parkscape. In 1660 the estate passed out of royal hands to George Monck, Lord Albemarle, then the Hyde family, Earls of Clarendon, who sold it to the Bathursts in 1707.





From the Parliament Writs and Writs of Military Summons

1277 William de Dernefod (Willielmus de Derneford) Knight performing Military Service due from R. le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk and Marshall of England - Muster at Worchester, in Eight Days of St John the Baptist 1st July

1301 Willielmus de Derenford Summonsed from the Counties of Oxford and Berkshire to perform Military Service against the Scots.  Muster at Berwick upon Tweed, on the Navity of St John the Baptist 24th June



Another William de Derneford.

There is a birth from Nottingham, perhaps this is the not so good William

William de Derneford   Birth:  1255 - Nottinghamshire, England   Death:  1301 - Cromwell, Nottinghamshire, England


Around 1290 William de Derneford had to payt 200 marks to the Earl of Gloucester by detaining him and threatening him

And in 1294 another William de Derneford was in Gloucester gaol, having broken out of prison at Old Sarum.

Commission 29 July 1294 to Roger le Rus and Giles de Berkeley (see 1290) to deliver 
Gloucester gaol of William de Derneford, in custody there on the appeal of a King's
approver, who broke prison at Old Sarum, fled to church, and abjured the realm.
He was placed in many other commissions of oyer and terminer, especially in cos. Hereford 
and Gloucester, 1282-94. (Patent Rolls). 

Around the year 1340, Chepstow Park Wood was taken over by a band of outlaws led by 
William de Derneford.

 







Commission to William de Derneford and Roger le Rus on information that William son of John Payn of Gloucester and Gregory Berde have collected a huge multitude and daily and nightly perpetrate murders, depredations and arsons in the county of Gloucester and to discover the guilty and inform the sheriff that he may imprison them  30 March 1290 Chipping Norton


Lands at Deerhurst                                                                                  
One of two churches in Deerhurst


 From the Archives in Kew

William de Derneford to grant the manor of Deerhurst (Glouc.) &c. to the abbot and convent of Westminster, in exchange for a grant of the manor of Islip (Oxford) and a rent in Toddenham (Glouc.) to himself and Cecily his wife for their lives. Glouc. Oxford.  Date 27 EDWARD I

The histories of Deerhurst, Elmstone Hardwicke, Leigh, and Tirley are given under Deerhurst hundred, that of Boddington under Tewkesbury hundred, since the respective parish churches lay in those two hundreds.

Islip /ˈslɪp/ is a village and civil parish on the River Ray, just above its confluence with the River Cherwell in Oxfordshire, England. It is about 2 miles (3 km) east of Kidlington and about 5 miles (8 km) north of Oxford.

When the Domesday Book was compiled, Islip's system of common fields was entirely on the north side of the River Ray. At some time after this and before 1300, Islip's villagers assarted (i.e. cleared) about 200 acres (81 ha) of uncultivated land south of the River Ray and east of the River Cherwell and divided it into strips as a new common field for strip farming.


Records from British History Online


They included john de Kirkby (Preston, july 1334); Elias of St. Albans (Durnford, Oct.

1334); john de la Chaurnbre (Minor Pars Altaris, May 1340); jarnes de Havant (Beaminster Secunda, june 1340); Peter de Inkepenne (Bishopstone, jan. 1341, transferred to Wilsford and Woodford, Sept.); Bartholomew de Bradden (Axford, Feb. 1344, Warminster, 1349). ’Of the clerks collated to prebends and dignities by Wyville, his brother Walter, john de la Chaumbre, Bartholomew de Bradden and Thomas de Welewyke .

The franchises of Westminster Abbey's liberty, in the part of Deerhurst hundred that later became the lower division of Westminster hundred, were held of the abbey between c. 1150 and 1299 by members of the Derneford family, who also held the abbey's manor of Deerhurst or Plaistow.


Later in the 13th century both the abbot and William de Derneford had view of frankpledge, and the abbot also claimed return of writs, fugitives' and felons' goods, vetitum namium, and all the amercements of his men.

In addition to the court rolls of c. 1386–1786, mentioned in Volume VI, there are court books of the lower division, described as of Plaistow manor, for the period 1729–1817, when the court was held only once a year, and miscellaneous papers up to 1868.

The jurisdiction of the Plaistow court was exercised by the lessees of Deerhurst manor estate. In 1276 it was complained that the Abbot of Westminster had those who were arrested in the hundred taken to Westminster for trial, although he had no right to hold them for more than one night and was then obliged to have them taken to Gloucester Castle.

In 1488 the abbot had a house in Deerhurst, called the stock house, which the bailiff of the liberty or hundred used for keeping prisoners.

Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300

William de Derneford holds the manor of Derhurst with the hamlets of Herdewyk, Walton, Cors, Trynleghe, and Hanrugge, and the 4th part of the hundred of Derhurst of the Abbot and Convent of Westminster in fee farm for £34 of yearly rent, and that the said manor with the said hamlets is worth per annum, clear, £36, besides the said farm.
Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)
Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300

49/318/18 cont. of Deerhurst, in which case the chaplain is to  choose another
day, and on other days at Deerhurst. In return Richard grants to the priory the arable land lying in the enclosure of Theo... which he cultivates and holds in demesne and the meadow called Brodemede towards Hawes.

Witnesses :
Sir William de Derneford, knight, Richard Pancelot of Walton, Robert of Yinton, Simon of Walton, Simon of Apperleye,Adam de Grava,R... de Apperley, Stephen Walk ..., Peter Gerveyle and others
Seal tag Endorsed : in capella de Ancrecerche


Very stained and faded, some holes and rodent dam


Lands at Staunton


There was then a rent due from the manor to the Prior of Worcester and Sir William de Derneford, and the tenants of Staunton and their wives had a meal on Christmas Day (ibid.). See also Cal. Fins R. 1272–1307, p. 244; Cal. Close, 1279– 88, p. 501.


Lands at Huske    

The extract shows just how large the holding must have been and the record is in relation to a claim on a will.

1328 June 9 Woodstock   Grant to William de Derneford of the biliwick of the Isle of Wyght during pleasure as held by Robert de Dumbelton
Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300


The yearly rent of assize of the freemen, bondmen, and cottars is worth by the year £13 10s. 11 1/2d., whereof there is owing yearly to Sir William de Derneford, Knt., 9s. 4d.; to Sir Reginald son of Peter, 9s.; to the prioress of the convent of Huske, 3s. 4d. And so there remains clear to the use of the lord of the said manor £12 9s. 3 1/2d. They owe to the lord of the said manor of yearly rent 2 1/2 lb. of wax, price 12 1/2d.; 1 lb. of pepper, price 10d.; 1 lb. of cummin, price 2d.; 6 barbed arrows, price 2d.; 4 capons, price 8d.; 1 cock, price 1/2d.; 4 hens, price 4d. Sum, 3s. 3d.

All the meadow of the said manor is contained and accounted within the said land.
The yearly rent of assize of the freemen, bondmen, and cottars is worth by the year "13 10s. 1 \\d., whereof there is owing yearly to Sir William de Derneford, Knt., gs. \d. ; to Sir Reginald son of Peter, gs. ; to the prioress of the convent of Huske, 3^. \d. And so there remains clear to the use of the lord of the said manor "12 9.?. 3^/. They owe to the lord of the said manor of yearly rent 2\ lb. of wax, price \2\d.\ 1 lb. of pepper, price lod. ; lib. of cummin, price 2d.; 6 barbed arrows, price 2d.;.
4 capons, price 8d. ; 1 cock, price \d. ; 4 hens, price 4*/. Sumr 3-y. id.

There are there 5 bondmen, each of whom holds \ virgate of land, and owes   works every week in the year for 2 days, except 3 solemn weeks, and 4 weeks, allotted to each of them by ancient custom in case of illness. And the work of each day of each of the said bondmen is worth by the year \d., and so there remains to the use of the lord of the said works 18s. gd.
There are there 25 bondmen, each of whom holds the fourth part of a virgate of land, and each of them ought to work every week in the year for 1 day, which is worth %d., except the 7 weeks aforesaid. And so there remains to the use of the lord of the said works 54^. 2d.

All the said 25 bondmen ought to collect among themselves 3 times in the year 12 ploughs and plough for the lord for 1 day*
97 each of them \ acre, and the said ploughing of \ acre is worth 2d.
Sum of the ploughing, 6s.

There are there 7 bondmen who are bound to work, for 8 weeks in the autumn, each week for 1 day. And the work of each day of each of them is worth ihd. Sum, "js. As well the bondmen as the cottars ought to weed in the whole by the year as if they were 73! by 1 day, and the work of each of them by the day is worth \d.

There are there 34 bondmen, each of whom ought to reap 4 times in autumn by 1 day, and the work of each day of each of the aforesaid is worth 1 \d.

There are there 68 bondmen and cottars, each of whom ought to reap for \ a   day in autumn, and the work of each of them is worth \d. Sum, 4*. id.
There are there 34 bondmen, of whom 2 jointly ought to carry once in the year the hay or corn by 1 day. And the carriage of each cart is worth 2d. And there is owing to each cart from the lord of the manor 2 loaves of bread and 1 sheaf of corn of ancient custom, which is worth \d. Sum of the carriage, 2s.

There are there 19 cottars, who ought to put the hay into cocks, reap the flax, and plant the beans when it shall be necessary. And the work of each is worth by the year \d.

There are there 41 bondmen, each of whom ought to give 1 hen at the Nativity of our Lord, each of which is worth id. Sum, 3^. $d. Also each of them owes at Easter 6 eggs. Sum, 246, which are worth 6\d.
All the said bondmen and cottars ought to give yearly of tallage 2 marks.
There are there 7 tenants, who ought to give for their land yearly for pannage \\d., and also yearly for the pannage of the pigs, Js. 6d.

There are there 2 water mills for corn and 1 fulling mill, 2 whereof, viz., 1 for corn and the other for fulling, are let to farm for 4 marks at equal terms, which 4 marks are accounted for above among the rents of assize and they are worth in common years 100s.

Of the pasture nothing, because it is joined above to the 5 carucates of land.
The fishing is worth in common years h a mark. The easement of the wood is worth by the year 10s.

The dovecote is worth by the year I2d.

The easement of the castle of the court and of the house there is worth by the year 4*. GLOUC. INQ., VOL. IV.

The pleas and perquisites of the said manor are worth by the year 10 marks.
There are there 2 churches, one whereof the Prior of Lonto dency holds to his own uses, and the presentation of the other belongs to the lord of the manor, and is worth to him by the year i a mark. Sum, " a mark, and it is worth to the possessor "13. Sum of the value of this manor of Kaldecote in all issues, "40 1 5 s. $d.

The capital messuage, with the garden adjacent, is worth per annum 4s. There is there 1 dovecote, which is worth per annum 12d. There are there 3 water-mills by the bank, which are worth per annum 30s. There are there 2 groves, containing about 8 acres, the underwood whereof is worth per annum, without waste, 2s. There are there 216 acres of arable land, price of the acre 3d. Sum, 54s. Also 10 acres of meadow, price of the acre 18d. Sum, 15s. The pasture is worth per annum 2s. There is there of the rent of freemen and cottars per annum, without the rent resolute to the Prior of Worcester and Sir William de Derneford, which is 60s. £8 2s. 10 1/2d., whereof at the feast of the Annunciation of our Lady £4 1s. 6 1/4d., and at the feast of St. Michael £4 1s. 6 1/4d.

Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)
Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300

The yearly rent of assize of the freemen, bondmen, and cottars is worth by the year £13 10s. 11 1/2d., whereof there is owing yearly to Sir William de Derneford, Knt., 9s. 4d.; to Sir Reginald son of Peter, 9s.; to the prioress of the convent of Huske, 3s. 4d. And so there remains clear to the use of the lord of the said manor £12 9s. 3 1/2d. They owe to the lord of the said manor of yearly rent 2 1/2 lb. of wax, price 12 1/2d.; 1 lb. of pepper, price 10d.; 1 lb. of cummin, price 2d.; 6 barbed arrows, price 2d.; 4 capons, price 8d.; 1 cock, price 1/2d.; 4 hens, price 4d. Sum, 3s. 3d.
Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)
Little Missenden




Little Missenden is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. It is in the Chiltern Hills, about three miles south east of Great Missenden, three miles west of Amersham.

The toponym "Missenden" is derived from the Old English for "valley where marsh plants grow". In the Domesday Book of 1086 the two villages are recorded as Missedene and Little Missenden is clearly identifiable by two hides owned between three landlords. One of these hides belonging to the Count of Mortain (around Town Farm) expanded after Domesday to become the manor of Holmer whence the village of Holmer Green was born. Other hamlets which are in the ancient parish of Little Missenden are Beamond End, Mop End, Spurlands End, Little Kingshill, Brays Green and Hyde Heath.


Buckingham.Inq. Monday the morrow of the Epiphany, 3 Edw. I.

Little Messenden. ½ virgate land held of Sir William de Derneford for 1d. yearly.



Lands in Thockfield



Date range: 1245 - 1259 ... meadow reaching from Thocford lake to William de Derneford's land, 
Lands at Weston Gloucester



Inquisition taken at Wynth' on Sunday next after the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist, 2 Edw. 1st [ 1274 ], before Sir Robert de Kinggeston of the lands and tenements which were of Geoffrey de Langeleye in Weston Mauduyt, in co. Gloucester, by William de Derneford, William le Frankelayn, William le Sweyn, Thomas Leffi, Henry Hodierne, Robert son of Chevaler, Robert le Frankelayn, William bastard, Richard le Frankelayn, Walter Clayn, Rendolf le Marscal, and William Wigod, who say that
Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)
Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300


Inquisition taken at Botyndone before John de Hampton, the King's escheator, on Sunday next after the feast of St. Hilary, 19 Edward 2nd [1326] , by the oath of John de Parys, Roger atte Halle, Thomas Prike, Reginald atte Tounesende, John de Okyntone, Thomas atte Stowe, John de Alre, Ralph de Walton, John de Derneford, William Deuerous, John de Wythileye, and Peter Horne, who say that

Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)
Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for Gloucestershire, Returned into the High Court of Chancery, 1302-1358


Inquisition made before Richard de Berkele, sub-escheator in co. Gloucester, by the oath of William de Derneford, John de Alre, William Bruse, Geoffrey Aylwy, Robert Gerard, Hugh le Duk, Thomas de la Forde, Jordan de Leghe, Nicholas Omett, Richard Dudevill, Nicholas Bruse, and Walter de Newent, as to how much land John de Mucegros held of the King in chief on the day of his death, &c., &c.
Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)
Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300

The capital messuage, with the garden adjacent, is worth per annum 4s. There is there 1 dovecote, which is worth per annum 12d. There are there 3 water-mills by the bank, which are worth per annum 30s. There are there 2 groves, containing about 8 acres, the underwood whereof is worth per annum, without waste, 2s. There are there 216 acres of arable land, price of the acre 3d. Sum, 54s. Also 10 acres of meadow, price of the acre 18d. Sum, 15s. The pasture is worth per annum 2s. There is there of the rent of freemen and cottars per annum, without the rent resolute to the Prior of Worcester and Sir William de Derneford, which is 60s. £8 2s. 10 1/2d., whereof at the feast of the Annunciation of our Lady £4 1s. 6 1/4d., and at the feast of St. Michael £4 1s. 6 1/4d.
Book: Burialls 1604. (Burial)

Lands perhaps from his father Sir Roger de Derneford in Botinton and Kenemerton

Collection: Gloucestershire: - Abstracts and Inquisitiones Post Mortem,1236-1300

The said Robert held the manor of Botinton of triple lordship, to wit, 1 part of the fee of the Earl of Gloucester, and that part answers to the manor of Kenemerton for the royal service as it shall happen, for the 4th part of a knight's fee; another part of the fee of the Abbot of Westminster, and that part pays to Sir Roger de Derneford, who is the mesne, 28s. 4d.; and 1 part of the fee of the Prior of Derherst, and that part pays to the said Prior 7s. 2d. The said manor is worth per annum £40.




By the time of King Edward III there is stilll a William de Derneford as per the grant.



From King Edward III   As he granted William de Derneford to be the bailiwick of Isle of Wight












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